Thoughts on “Call Me By Your Name”

(Spoilers below) It's been about 24 hours since I saw Luca Guadagnino's film, "Call Me By Your Name," and I am kind of alarmed by how long and powerfully the feeling of watching it has lingered, like a bell that continues to echo across a field long after it has been struck. For me, the … Continue reading Thoughts on “Call Me By Your Name”

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Waiting for Irma: September 10, 2017

My grandmother, Evelyn Schiller, sits in her small apartment in Sarasota, Florida, waiting for a category-4 hurricane to arrive. She turned 94 last week, and resides in an assisted living facility, where she spends most of her time since she does not walk well anymore. She dines with the other residents each day and night, … Continue reading Waiting for Irma: September 10, 2017

Fireworks, Cacophony, Hendrix, and the New Patriotism of Future National Holidays

My dad, my brother and I used to sit in our backyard after it got dark on the 4th of July and watch the fireworks. We lived at the top of a hill in a small, rural town in upstate New York, overlooking a forest that tumbled down a steep hill toward the rest of … Continue reading Fireworks, Cacophony, Hendrix, and the New Patriotism of Future National Holidays

New York City Educational Reform, Then and Now: Charter Schools, Community Control, and the Strike of 1968

Over the past month, I've been subbing in charter schools in New York City and writing about the experience. This longer, culminating essay is a messy attempt at historicizing present-day charter school reform, with a discussion of a completely different kind of reform that was briefly on the table in the late 1960s.  ***** Bird’s-Eye … Continue reading New York City Educational Reform, Then and Now: Charter Schools, Community Control, and the Strike of 1968